Global Accessibility Awareness Day May 19th

How can we help our communities and The Global Fund to end HIV and AIDS?

This year, Global Accessibility Awareness Day (GAAD) is on May 19. GAAD is meant to get everyone talking, thinking and learning about digital access/inclusion and people with different disabilities. In addition to giving a voice to the 1 billion people with disabilities around the world, GAAD also aims to provide education and insight for those who are not disabled.

When thinking of accessibility, many people will automatically think of physical access such as wheelchair ramps or braille signs. But what about digital access? The internet has become an essential part of our lives. Most transactions today happen online, whether through a website or an app. We use the internet to do our tasks at work, keep in touch with friends and family and even relax by watching videos or reading blogs in the evening. However, this access isn’t guaranteed for persons with disabilities; many websites aren’t easily accessible for those with visual impairments or hearing difficulties.

The Internet has been designed for sighted users. For instance:

Screen readers don’t work properly on many websites;

Users who are blind can’t know where links are when they are using keyboards instead of mice;

For the past three years, we have been working with the United Nations Foundation and The Global Fund to fight HIV/AIDS. We have so far raised $1 million through our (RED) partnership and are now extending our efforts to other parts of the business.

We’ve been working on accessible flight information for many months and will be launching it in May, which is Global Accessibility Awareness Day. This day is a community-driven effort to raise awareness about digital accessibility and users with different disabilities.

On May 19th, you can go to Google Maps (and Google Flights) and search for accessible routes to your destination. We’ve partnered with Aira, a service that connects blind or low-vision individuals with trained agents who can describe what they see through their smartphone camera. You can use Aira agents to help you navigate through airports—using everything from check-in kiosks, security lines and gates all the way up to finding restrooms and even locating charging stations.

The Global Fund to End HIV and AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria is a rapidly growing organization working globally to end HIV, TB and malaria as epidemics. We are looking for a Social Media Manager to join our Communications team in Geneva.

The purpose of the role is to drive the Global Fund’s social media strategy and content creation, with a specific focus on Facebook and Twitter. The Social Media Manager will work closely with the Communications team to integrate social media into all communications campaigns and provide support to Country Offices for their own local social media efforts. An important part of the role will be sharing best practices and expertise within the organization, including building capacity for Country Office staff and field staff in high-burden countries.

This is an exciting opportunity for someone who loves social media and wants to make a difference in global health. It is open to candidates from any country.

The Global Fund offers competitive salary packages based on skills, experience and local regulations. The grade for this position is F2 (see http://www.theglobalfund.org/en/jobs/career-levels/).

The Global Fund to End AIDS, TB & Malaria is the world’s largest financer of programs that aim to end these epidemics. It invests on a large-scale in prevention and treatment programs that save lives.

While the world has made remarkable progress against these diseases, the fight is far from over. To end these epidemics, we have to scale up funding for programs that are saving lives and preventing new infections.

Visit our blog for more information about the Global Fund’s impact, why we still need your support, and the priorities for their next replenishment round.

The Global Fund was created in 2002 to bring together a wide range of actors under one umbrella to tackle these three deadly diseases with one common goal: ending HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria as epidemics by 2030.

The Global Fund utilizes contributions from governments and private donors to invest in lifesaving programs run by local experts in countries and communities most in need. These programs provide prevention measures such as bed nets or condoms, testing and counseling, medical treatment like antiretroviral therapy (ART) or tuberculosis medicines, care services like health workers or community support networks and strategic information to better understand what works.

This is a blog post from the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The Global Fund is a 21st-century partnership organization designed to accelerate the end of AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria as epidemics. Founded in 2002, the Global Fund is a partnership between governments, civil society, the private sector and people affected by the diseases. The Global Fund raises and invests nearly US$4 billion a year to support programs run by local experts in countries and communities most in need. Since 2003, the Global Fund has invested more than US$33 billion in programs run by local experts in 140 countries. By investing in prevention, treatment and care for these three diseases we are providing opportunities for better health, stronger communities and more effective strategies to overcome poverty.

The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria is a unique global public/private partnership dedicated to attracting and disbursing additional resources to prevent and treat HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. This partnership between governments, civil society, the private sector and affected communities represents an innovative approach to international health financing. The Global Fund works in close collaboration with other bilateral and multilateral organizations to supplement existing efforts dealing with the three diseases.

The Global Fund is governed by a Board of Directors consisting of representatives from donor nations, developing countries and affected communities. The Board meets twice annually to make funding decisions.

The Global Fund’s Secretariat, based in Geneva, Switzerland, manages the day-to-day operations of the organization under the guidance of a General Manager and Executive Director. The Secretariat provides strategic guidance for country proposals and develops processes for evaluating proposals.

Since its creation in 2002 through December 2007, the Global Fund has approved US$ 9.7 billion in funding for more than 500 programs in 140 countries, leveraging an additional $2.8 billion from co-financing partners.

The Global Fund is a unique, public-private partnership and international financing institution dedicated to attracting and disbursing additional resources to prevent and treat HIV and AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. This partnership between governments, civil society, the private sector and affected communities represents an innovative approach to international health financing.

The Global Fund works in close collaboration with other bilateral and multilateral organizations to supplement existing efforts dealing with the three diseases. To date, the Global Fund has approved funding of US$ 26.6 billion for more than 1,000 programs in 150 countries, including US$ 3.7 billion for HIV/AIDS programs in low- and middle-income countries.

The Global Fund’s Model – Innovative, Results-based Funding

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